TEUNIS WYERS

Since I have added the photo of Olga Jane Kreps Hecomovich, it would be a good time to add a photo of her grandfather.
This photo comes from the May 13, 1965 Mt Adams Sun. The story of his life can be read at this link.
http://mas.stparchive.com/Archive/MAS/MAS05131965P01.php

Teunis was born in Holland in 1876 to Teunis Wyers and Maria Wilhelmina Heyting Wyers. The family came to the White Salmon area in 1891. His siblings were John Wyers, Hendrika Wyers Claterbos, Gertrude Wyers Kreps, Peter Wyers and Wilhelmina Wyers Shepler.

When Teunis was 18 years old he sub-contracted the mail route to Glenwood. His first mail trip to Glenwood was made in July of 1894.
On July 2, 1944 there was a celebration to commemorate his 50 years of mail service to Glenwood.
From the June 29, 1944 Goldendale Sentinel
"On Wyers' famous first ride, of July 2, 1884, he did not even know where Glenwood was, but just started out, following a rather vague set of directions. The change was made at George Gilmer's valley home along the way, where Tune also had his noon meal. When he finally arrived at his destination, he was served his dinner by Mrs. Adelaid Howe, then Mrs. Schultz. Mrs. Howe cooked for sheepmen, and for anyone who happen to venture that way.
When he arrived in Glenwood he saw the people erecting a platform for their Fourth of July celebration.
When Wyers makes his ride again this year, he will find upon entering the town the same thing … people celebrating not only the Fourth, but also his arrival."

During his long career of carrying the mail he established a national record and upheld the motto of the Post Office Department: "Not snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night stay these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds."
The first few years were the hardest----but he never missed a trip.
Mail service to Gilmer, Fulda and Glenwood was three times a week. Houses were few and far between. Snow was sometimes six feet deep. Plowing roads was unheard of. When Tune's horse gave out, he finished the route on foot.
His mail, stage and freight business grew. At one time he owned about 100 head of horses and had 80 in harness.
In 1902 he married Olga Lauterbach.
They had two daughters. Mrs. Russell Kreps and Mrs. Bernard Pollard.

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